Monday, 15 August 2016

Tense Of English..





Once there was a man whose name was Tense, he had three children and their name was Present, Past & Future. So, the man, Tense decided that he should name his grandchildren in a way that….. wo wo wo ….wait a while, a long story about Tense..…This part is quite known to all & everyone is handsomely habituated with this. How about in chart wise or table wise, at least by this we can grab anything under 1 table. Some points here I added such as, Verb conjugation, modal’s effect, etc which I think is very much important and they all should be learnt  & do we need to arise question, I ‘ll always entertain such.. So here we go;

Tense Tables
Positive / Negative / Question Forms in All Tenses

This guide to the verb structure of all 12 English tenses (13 counting the future with 'going to') will be helpful for all English learners who find charts instructive. In the chart each tense is clearly labelled with a short information which is easy for understanding. To more information on the tense included on the positive forms need to search in the search engine, for their own betterment of knowledge or wait for my updates.
Go for it Fellas!!!
Positive Forms
The first table shows positive forms in all tenses.
Tense
Subject
Helping Verb
Main Verb (String)
Objects / Time / Place
Present Simple
I
-
eat
breakfast at 8 in the morning.
Use the present simple to talk about activities or routines which take place on a regular basis.
You
-
eat
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

He
-
eats
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

She
-
eats
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

It
-
eats
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

We
-
eat
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

You
-
eat
breakfast at 8 in the morning.

They
-
eat
breakfast at 8 in the morning.
Present Continuous
I
am
learning
English online right now.

The present continuous tense, also known as the present progressive tense in some grammar books, is one of the most often used tenses in English. It is also one of the tenses that English learners use incorrectly. It is important to remember that the present continuous tense is generally used to express something happening at the moment of speaking. It is not used to express everyday habits and routines. Everyday habits and routines are expressed using the present simple tense. It is also important to remember that the present continuous is only used with action verbs and not stative verbs.

You
are
learning
English online right now.

He
is
learning
English online right now.

She
is
learning
English online right now.

It
is
learning
English online right now.

We
are
learning
English online right now.

You
are
learning
English online right now.

They
are
learning
English online right now.
Past Simple
I
-
went
to the store yesterday.
Use the past simple to talk about activities or routines which take place at a specified time in the past. Notice that all subjects take the same conjugation of the verb. Regular verbs end in '-ed'.
visit - visited
enjoy - enjoyed
Irregular verbs have various forms and each verb needs to be learned.
see - saw
think - thought
The past simple is used to express a finished past action which occurs at a specific moment in the past.
You
-
went
to the store yesterday.

He
-
went
to the store yesterday.

She
-
went
to the store yesterday.

It
-
went
to the store yesterday.

We
-
went
to the store yesterday.

You
-
went
to the store yesterday.

They
-
went
to the store yesterday.
Past Continuous
I
was
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.
The main concept to introduce when teaching the past continuous is the idea that the past continuous expresses an interrupted action. In other words, the past continuous speaks about what was going on when something important happened. The past continuous can be used by itself to express what happened at a precise moment in the past. However, the most common use is together with the past simple

Something happening at a specific point of time in the past.

Something that was happening during a period of time in the past.
Something that was happening when something important took place.
Something that was happening while something else was happening.
You
were
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

He
was
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

She
was
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

It
was
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

We
were
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

You
were
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.

They
were
cooking
dinner when you came home yesterday.
Future with Will
I
will
come
to class tomorrow
The future with 'will' is used to make future predictions and promises. Often the precise moment the action will occur is unknown or not defined.
You
will
come
to class tomorrow

He
will
come
to class tomorrow

She
will
come
to class tomorrow

It
will
come
to class tomorrow

We
will
come
to class tomorrow

You
will
come
to class tomorrow

They
will
come
to class tomorrow
Future with Going to
I
am going to
fly
to New York next week.
The future with 'going to' is used to express events you have already planned in the future and your intentions for the future. We sometimes also use the present continuous for planned events in the near future.
You
are going to
fly
to New York next week.

He
is going to
fly
to New York next week.

She
is going to
fly
to New York next week.

It
is going to
fly
to New York next week.

We
are going to
fly
to New York next week.

You
are going to
fly
to New York next week.

They
are going to
fly
to New York next week.
Future Continuous
I
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.
In general, the future continuous tense is used to express what will be happening at a specific moment in the future. The tense is often used to contrast the difference between what is happening at the present moment and how things will be different at a future moment.

Something that will be happening at a specific future point in time.

Something that will be happening while something else happens in the future.
You
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

He
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

She
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

It
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

We
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

You
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.

They
will be
working
at 5 pm tomorrow evening.
Present Perfect
I
have
taught
English for many years.
The present perfect is used to say what has happened recently and has an effect on the present moment. We often use 'just', 'yet' and 'already' to express the relationship to the present moment.
The present perfect is also used to express something which has happened up to the present moment of time.
You
have
taught
English for many years.

He
has
taught
English for many years.

She
has
taught
English for many years.

It
has
taught
English for many years.

We
have
taught
English for many years.

You
have
taught
English for many years.

They
have
taught
English for many years.
Present Perfect Continuous
I
have been
watching
TV for three hours.
The present perfect continuous is used to express how long a current activity has been going on. It is often used in context to provide a reason for a present result. Remember that continuous forms can only be used with action verbs.
This tense is often used with the following time expressions:
...since + specific point in time
... for + amount of time
You
have been
watching
TV for three hours.

He
has been
watching
TV for three hours.

She
has been
watching
TV for three hours.

It
has been
watching
TV for three hours.

We
have been
watching
TV for three hours.

You
have been
watching
TV for three hours.

They
have been
watching
TV for three hours.
Past Perfect
I
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.
The past perfect tense is used to speak about an action that occurs before another action in the past.

Something that had happened before something else took place,

Something that had happened over a period of time in the past before another point in the of past.

Something that had happened as a precondition to something else.
You
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

He
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

She
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

It
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

We
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

You
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.

They
had
eaten
lunch before you came home yesterday.
Past Perfect Continuous
I
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.
In general, the pat perfect continuous describes how long one action had been taking place before something else happened. As with other continuous tenses, the past perfect continuous tense is not used with stative verbs.

Something that had been happening before something else took place.

Something that had been happening over a period of time in the past up until another point in the past.

Something that had been happening in preparation for something else.
You
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

He
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

She
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

It
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

We
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

You
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.

They
had been
working
for three hours before he arrived.
Future Perfect
I
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
The future perfect is used to speak about what will have happened before a future point in time. This tense is not commonly used in everyday English, and many English speakers often use the future simple (with will) instead of the future perfect. Still, the use of the future perfect allows you to express what you expect to have finished by a certain point in time.
You
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

He
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

She
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

It
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

We
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

You
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

They
will have
finished
the report by three o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
Future Perfect Continuous
I
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.
Use the future perfect continuous to speak about how long something will have been going on up to a future point in time. The future perfect continuous is not commonly used in everyday English, but is quite common in the workplace to discuss and give updates about how work is progressing. Be careful to not confuse the future perfect continuous with the future perfect tense
You
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

He
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

She
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

It
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

We
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

You
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.

They
will have been
studying
English for five hours by four o'clock this afternoon.


There are few other points which we need to take under consideration, those are;
Conditional Forms If questions - What would you do if you had enough time? / If she is in town, she'll come to the meeting.

Alternate Conditional Forms Going to 'Going to' is often used to replace 'will' in the first conditional. This is often done to emphasize a certain result. Example
If you apply to that school with your excellent marks, you're going to be accepted!
'Going to' is also used to mean 'intend to' after 'if'.
Example
If you're going to skip school, you certainly won't pass your exams.
Etc.

Modal Forms Asking Permission, Giving Advice, etc. - May I help you? / He should see a doctor.

Modal Verbs of Probability Stating guesses - He must have stayed at home today. / She might be downstairs.

Negative Forms
The second table shows negative forms in all tenses.
Tense
Subject
Helping Verb + Not
Main Verb (String)
Objects / Time / Place
Present Simple
I
don't
visit
my friends every day.

You
don't
visit
my friends every day.

He
doesn't
visit
my friends every day.

She
doesn't
visit
my friends every day.

It
doesn't
visit
my friends every day.

We
don't
visit
my friends every day.

You
don't
visit
my friends every day.

They
don't
visit
my friends every day.
Present Continuous
I
am not
studying
math at the moment.

You
aren't
studying
math at the moment.

He
isn't
studying
math at the moment.

She
isn't
studying
math at the moment.

It
isn't
studying
math at the moment.

We
aren't
studying
math at the moment.

You
aren't
studying
math at the moment.

They
aren't
studying
math at the moment.
Past Simple
I
didn't
play
soccer last week.

You
didn't
play
soccer last week.

He
didn't
play
soccer last week.

She
didn't
play
soccer last week.

It
didn't
play
soccer last week.

We
didn't
play
soccer last week.

You
didn't
play
soccer last week.

They
didn't
play
soccer last week.
Future with Will
I
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

You
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

He
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

She
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

It
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

We
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

You
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.

They
won't
cook
dinner tomorrow.
Future with Going to
I
am not going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

You
aren't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

He
isn't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

She
isn't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

It
isn't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

We
aren't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

You
aren't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.

They
aren't going to
fly
to Chicago next week.
Future Continuous
I
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

You
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

He
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

She
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

It
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

We
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

You
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.

They
won't be
sitting
at a computer next week at this time.
Present Perfect
I
haven't
seen
Tom since 2008.

You
haven't
seen
Tom since 2008.

He
hasn't
seen
Tom since 2008.

She
hasn't
seen
Tom since 2008.

It
hasn't
seen
Tom since 2008.

We
haven't
seen
Tom since 2008.

You
haven't
seen
Tom since 2008.

They
haven't
seen
Tom since 2008.
Present Perfect Continuous
I
haven't been
studying
for very long.

You
haven't been
studying
for very long.

He
hasn't been
studying
for very long.

She
hasn't been
studying
for very long.

It
hasn't been
studying
for very long.

We
haven't been
studying
for very long.

You
haven't been
studying
for very long.

They
haven't been
studying
for very long.
Past Perfect
I
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

You
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

He
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

She
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

It
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

We
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

You
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.

They
hadn't
eaten
lunch before I arrived.
Past Perfect Continuous
I
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

You
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

He
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

She
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

It
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

We
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

You
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.

They
hadn't been
sleeping
very long when I woke him.
Future Perfect
I
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

You
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

He
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

She
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

It
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

We
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

You
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.

They
won't have
prepared
the report by Friday.
Future Perfect Continuous
I
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

You
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

He
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

She
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

It
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

We
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

You
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.

They
won't have been
driving
for very long this time tomorrow.
Question Forms
The third table shows question forms in all tenses.
Tense
Question Word
Helping Verb
Subject
Main Verb (String)
Objects / Time / Place?
Present Simple
How often
do
I
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
do
You
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
does
He
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
does
She
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
does
It
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
do
We
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
do
You
eat
dinner in a restaurant?

How often
do
They
eat
dinner in a restaurant?
Present Continuous
What
am
I
doing
right now?

What
are
You
doing
right now?

What
is
He
doing
right now?

What
is
She
doing
right now?

What
is
It
doing
right now?

What
are
We
doing
right now?

What
are
You
doing
right now?

What
are
They
doing
right now?
Past Simple
Where
did
I
go
last week?

Where
did
You
go
last week?

Where
did
He
go
last week?

Where
did
She
go
last week?

Where
did
It
go
last week?

Where
did
We
go
last week?

Where
did
You
go
last week?

Where
did
They
go
last week?
Future with Will
When
will
I
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
You
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
He
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
She
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
It
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
We
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
You
help
me with my homework tomorrow?

When
will
They
help
me with my homework tomorrow?
Future with Going to
Where
am
I
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
are
You
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
is
He
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
is
She
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
is
It
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
are
We
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
are
You
going to stay
in New York next week?

Where
are
They
going to stay
in New York next week?
Future Continuous
Where
will
I
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
You
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
He
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
She
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
It
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
We
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
You
be staying
tomorrow night?

Where
will
They
be staying
tomorrow night?
Present Perfect
How long
have
I
lived
in your current house?

How long
have
You
lived
in your current house?

How long
has
He
lived
in your current house?

How long
has
She
lived
in your current house?

How long
has
It
lived
in your current house?

How long
have
We
lived
in your current house?

How long
have
You
lived
in your current house?

How long
have
They
lived
in your current house?
Present Perfect Continuous
How long
have
I
been studying
today?

How long
have
You
been studying
today?

How long
has
He
been studying
today?

How long
has
She
been studying
today?

How long
has
It
been studying
today?

How long
have
We
been studying
today?

How long
have
You
been studying
today?

How long
have
They
been studying
today?
Past Perfect
Where
had
I
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
You
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
He
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
She
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
It
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
We
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
You
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?

Where
had
They
eaten
lunch before I arrived this afternoon?
Past Perfect Continuous
How long
had
I
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
You
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
He
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
She
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
It
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
We
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
You
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?

How long
had
They
been working
before Tom telephoned yesterday?
Future Perfect
How many books
will
I
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
You
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
He
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
She
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
It
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
We
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
You
have finished
by the end of next year?

How many books
will
They
have finished
by the end of next year?
Future Perfect Continuous
How long
will
I
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
You
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
He
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
She
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
It
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
We
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
You
have been working
by the end of the day?

How long
will
They
have been working
by the end of the day?

  • Here is a completed table that you can also use as an example during the lesson. 
Time
Simple
Continuous
Perfect
Perfect Continuous
Past
We went to school last week.
We were watching TV at 8 o'clock yesterday.
We had eaten before he came.
She had been waiting for two hours when he arrived.
Present
They usually come to class on time.
We are doing a grammar exercise now.
Mary has lived in Portland for ten years.
I have been working since 7 o'clock this morning.
Future
Tom will visit tomorrow.
Jane will be eating lunch at 1 o'clock tomorrow.
Jack will have finished the report by 5 o'clock.
They will have been studying for six hours by the end of class.
  •  

Verb Conjugation

Understanding Basic Verb Conjugation Patterns in English
Learning English tenses over time becomes easier because of the patterns that carry over from each tense. This tense learning grid helps English learners identify the patterns that a verb form will have whether in the past, present or future form. Of course, these patterns are not the only use for each of these tenses. However, understanding these verb conjugation patterns will help students identify at a more abstract level when forms are used.
There are four basic verb conjugation forms in English.
  • Simple Tenses
  • Progressive Tenses
  • Perfect Tenses
  • Perfect Progressive Tenses
Simple Tenses
Use simple tenses to speak about something that happens repeatedly in the present. Simple tenses are used in the past and future to speak about something that occurs once.
  • Mary often plays tennis on weekends.
  • Peter visited his parents in New York last month.
  • Tom will come to the event next week.
Progressive Tenses
Use progressive tenses to express actions that are in progress at a specific moment in time.
Do not use stative verbs with progressive tenses (i.e. love, like, hate, taste, feel, etc.)
  • The children are doing their homework at the moment.
  • Doug was cooking dinner when she arrived.
  • Christian will be enjoying his vacation this time next week.
Perfect Tenses
Use perfect tenses to express something that what has been completed from one point in time to another. Perfect tenses express what happens over time.
  • Susan has read four books by Hemingway.
  • They had already eaten before he arrived.
  • William will have finished the report by six o'clock.
Perfect Progressive Tenses
Perfect progressive tenses are a combination used to express the duration of a specific activity from one point in time to another. As with all progressive tenses, perfect progressive tenses do not take stative verbs (feel, think, hear, etc.)
  • We've been playing tennis since five o'clock.
  • They had been waiting at the bus stop for thirty minutes by the time it arrived.
  • Henry will have been studying for six hours by the end of this hour.
Notice how most tenses use time expressions to define a point in time as reference. These time expressions can also be time clauses which express an action as reference reference for the conjugation of the main clause. These time expressions can be thought of in the following ways based on the basic verb conjugation form.
  • Simple Tenses - time expressions or time clauses that define in a general way when something happened.
  • Progressive Tenses - time expressions or time clauses that define the specific moment in time when something happens.
  • Perfect Tenses - time expressions or time clauses that define the moment up to which something is completed.
  • Perfect Progressive Tenses - time expressions that indicate the duration of an action from one point in time to another.
Using this approach, you can see that there are twelve tenses in English. One tense for each verb conjugation form in the present (4 tenses), past (4 tenses), and future (4 tenses). Here is a chart that you can use to quickly review the twelve tenses of English:
Verb Conjugation Grid

Simple Tenses
Simple Tense Example
Progressive Tenses
Progressive Tense Example
Perfect Tenses
Perfect Tense Example
Perfect Progressive Tenses
Perfect Progressive Tense Example
Present
Present Simple
Jack usually takes a bus to work.
Present Progressive
Alice is writing her report at the moment.
Present Perfect
Billy has purchased three cars in his life.
Present Perfect Progressive
The students have been writing for twenty minutes.
Past
Past Simple
We drove to Yellowstone last
Past Progressive
Daniela was ironing at seven o'clock.
Past Perfect
They had completed the report by the time he requested to see it.
Past Perfect Progressive
My neighbors had been working outside for a few hours when their daughter telephoned with the news.
Future
Future Simple
I'll see you tomorrow afternoon.
Future Progressive
Tim will be making his presentation this time next week.
Future Perfect
We'll have the job finished by six o'clock.
Future Perfect Progressive
Mr. Josh will have been teaching for eight hour straight by the time he finishes.